A book recap: Basic Black

“It’s not about whether you can do it all, it’s about whether you can be happy whatever you’re doing”

– Cathie Black, former President of Hearst Magazines

Off of a book list recommended by Levo League, one of my favorite career development sites, I read Basic Black by Cathie Black, former President of Hearst Magazines.  If you ever read any Cosmo, Marie Claire, O: Oprah Magazine, or Seventeen between 1996 to 2010, then you in one way or another have been touched indirectly by Cathie Black.  My saving grace during high school was the now defunct CosmoGirl magazines. #rip

Black’s book was interesting.  For the past two years, I’ve had a growing interest in the career paths and struggles of success women and hers was one that I was only vaguely familiar with.6a0133ed1b1479970b0133ed6a4295970b

Black’s book touches on creating a 360 degree life which she defines as achieving balance in life and creating a life where you get deep satisfaction from all angles – personal life, work, and family.  Throughout the book, she goes through her experiences, her temperament during her early working days, and her strive for success, perfection, and achievement.  As someone equally as ambitious and as passionate about making an impact, I related to her drive and dedication.  When you’re in the middle of the action and all you can see is that ladder and each step you need to take, it’s hard to sometimes step back and look at the situation and appreciate what has been given to you and what you have earned.

I remember when I was in high school, I baby-sat these adorable kids whose parents shuffled them from one activity to the next.  Dance class, track, soccer, tennis lessons, music… it never stopped.  I would listen to the kids go on about their activities in exhaustion.  I barely had time to work part-time and study for chem class, let alone do all those activities on top of that.  Looking back now, it makes me wonder what we, as a society, gain from pushing kids into so many different activities.  While it is so important to let kids explore new and different interests to help them develop into interesting adults, I wonder if we’re raising a generation of overachieving, over-competitive individuals that will view adult life as a rat race.  My generation already feels the pains of constant competition.  We’re one of the first generations where discussions on can women have it all, work-life balance is ongoing.  At the pace we’re going. will the next generation need to have an actual class on this?  Is this the future society we want to create?

Cathie Black’s book dedicates a section on achieving balance.  She asks her readers to reflect on what’s important to them and what they are looking to achieve.  Her advice:  Have your all – not anyone else’s.  What worked for one person doesn’t necessarily work for someone else.

Overall, her book was a great read.  Easy layout so you can flip through to sections that appeals to you the most and it incorporates real examples of her time at Hearst and other publications she worked at.  A must read for anyone in the media industry.

Other interesting read on this topics:

Pursue a Lifestyle Not a Job – Lost Gen Y Girl

Why a Lifestyle Business Could Be a Better Fit For You Than a Startup – Sean Ogle